Thursday, January 31, 2013

Cooking With Color: When to Use Red in the Kitchen

Candy Apple Red, Red Licorice and more for your kitchen walls, cabinets or island? The color choices are as delicious as they sound.

Ever since I learned that most arguments in a family occur in a yellow kitchen, I have begun to look at other colors to consider in our space. Jennifer Ott is an Austin, Texas interior design
expert who offers the following great examples of what red can add to a kitchen. bbl
 
 
Red Paint Picks

Finding the right kind of red can be tough. Some are warmer, with more orange; others are cooler, with more blue. And how blue or orange they look is affected by adjacent colors. When considering red paint, it's a good idea to get samples of several versions you like and try them out in your space before making a commitment. Also, keep in mind that it can take several coats of red to get full coverage. If you will be using a primer, ask your paint retailer to tint the primer in preparation for red.

Some of my favorite reds (shown here, clockwise from top left):
1. Rectory Red 217, from Farrow & Ball, is a beautiful deep, saturated red.
2. Currant Red 1323, from Benjamin Moore, has some orange in it, making it a warm red.
3. Grenedier Red 3-14, from Pratt & Lambert, has blue in it, making it a cooler red.
4. Heartthrob SW6866, from Sherwin-Williams, is a vibrant and true red.
5. Cut Ruby 1009-4, from Valspar, is another true red with a small bit of blue in it.
6. Red Alert AC216-5, from Kelly-Moore, is a pretty pinkish red.
7. Candy Apple Red 8371, from Behr, is a bold red with a bit of orange.
8. Red Licorice 234-7, from Pittsburgh Paints, is a deep, cool red that's close to burgundy.

Now on to inspiration for using this lively hue in your kitchen.
What a colorful and fun kitchen this is! It's modern yet warm and inviting. By grounding the red with warm wood tones and contrasting it with a soothing green hue, the designer made this kitchen peppy without its becoming too much.
This space is magical to me. It speaks to my love of color and of clean, open spaces with abundant natural light. The bank of painted wood windows is utterly charming, as is the farmhouse sink and graceful gooseneck faucet. It's a kitchen that must be an absolute pleasure to cook and entertain in.
Consider your ceiling, otherwise known as the forgotten fifth wall, when decorating your kitchen. This neutral kitchen gets a wonderful punch of color via the hot red painted tile ceiling. Heavy stone and dark wood look great with the red which balances them. Do you think the red knobs on the stove might have given a clue to the designer who chose that vibrant red for the ceiling?
Don't neglect your floor either. Red is an attention-getting color, so use it on the floor only if you have an interesting material you want to call attention to, such as this scored concrete. The bright red floor, tempered with the multiple reds in the rug and the artwork make this room handsome. A color repeated in various shades always adds depth and interest and keeps our eyes moving around a space or a painting.
I'm a fan of bold accent walls, as they are an easy, affordable and low-commitment way to add excitement and drama to a room. This bright orange-red wall accentuates the interesting architecture of the space and pulls you right into the kitchen. Austere and cool greys and metal plus straight lines are softened by this warm red, It adds personality and adds a welcome foil for the blinding white on the right.
Not quite ready for a large wall of bright red? Try a smaller hit of color. This true red wall works well with the warm wood and orange hues. Analagous colors work well together. Note that the red adds some variety in a warm tone.
I usually advise design clients to stick with neutral colors for items that are difficult and expensive to change out, but I also believe in selecting materials you absolutely love. So, while your real estate agent or well-meaning friends and family might tell you to step away from the red tile backsplash, I say if you love it and plan to stay in your house for a while, go for it. But let it be the star of your kitchen by selecting supporting neutral colors and materials that don't compete with it, as this kitchen perfectly illustrates. I would tweak this one a bit. The tile appears to be cool red and the massive cabinets look warmish in comparison. After the tile is in place, the easiest solution might be to paint the cabinets a cool grey or charcoal grey to handle that massive shot of red. I like the tile's grey grout and the pattern which picks up the colors of the appliances and the drawer pulls, etc.
Appliances offer another way to pull red into your kitchen. Our eyes are drawn to red, so make sure you have appliances worthy of the attention, such as the range and work-of-art vent hood in this modern rustic beauty of a kitchen. The distressed red walls also pull the gaze in and up to the interesting architectural details of this amazing space. The walls are a mystery, they remind me of walls I once stripped of wallpaper then antiqued. What my eye is drawn to is the counter/desk top in the lower left of the picture. What an intriguing surface. Note that there are several finishes on the cabinets to add interest and contrast with the pale floor.
Private Comment
This gorgeous modern rustic kitchen has a red-clad island as the anchor. The red appears to have quite a bit of orange in it, which serves as a nice warm contrast to the cooler colors in the space. I would call the island color a greyed-red; its complement is added to neutralize it. I have always loved turquoise and red together. The only thing I would "lose in this room is the peach colored chair. It is too delicate to balance the large good and island.
I love the eye-catching red cabinetry in this fetching open-plan kitchen. If you opt for a bold hue on your base cabinets, consider using a neutral hue for your upper cabinets or installing open shelving. Either move will break up the red and keep it from becoming overwhelming.I like the bright red and stainless steel with open shelves. Handsome choices. Even though the cabinets look warm toned, the clerestory windows add so much light it works. Notice the same wood tone in the ceiling that shows to the upper right. Repetition brings the composition strength.

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